918.298.2300
culture@nimi.us
@TulsaIndianArts
 
NIMI OFFICE
"Black Elk Speaks" - a production of the American Indian Theatre Company of Oklahoma - 1984, starring Will Sampson, David Carradine, and Wes Studi. Performing Arts Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Council Oak Tree in Tulsa, OK

Our Mission


The National Indian Monument and Institute (NIMI) is the parent company of the Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival, the American Indian Theatre Company of Oklahoma, and the American Indian Arts Association.

NIMI is an national non-profit organization actively promoting and creating Native related programs and preserving those cultures through the arts and education. Our mission is to honor, preserve, sustain, and celebrate American Indian cultures.
To further this, we are currently raising money to build an American Indian Cultural Center and Museum Complex. The intention of the Center is to provide a facility of cultural exchange--languages, theatre, arts, cuisine, history, and most importantly, friendship. 


Visit our DONATE page to contribute a tax deductible gift to help our ongoing projects - We appreciate your gift in any amount! If you would like to join our circle of friends and help us achieve our goals, please contact us! We can be reached at (918) 298-2300 or e-mail culture@nimi.us.
To further this, we are currently raising money to build an American Indian Cultural Center and Museum Complex. The intention of the Center is to provide a facility of cultural exchange--languages, theatre, arts, cuisine, history, and most importantly, friendship. 

Mvskoke Youth Dace Tiger & Hope Harjo 
(Miss Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival) 
participated in the filming of a new promotional video for Tulsa Historical Society at the Council Oak Tree (Tulsa).

The Creek Council Tree, a mature burr oak, marks the traditional "busk ground" chosen in 1836 by the Lochapoka clan of Creek Indians. In late 1834, they had begun their involuntary migration from Alabama under the control of the U.S. Government. It was a slow and painful trek; of the original group of 630, 161 died in route. Their 1836 arrival was marked with a solemn and traditional ceremony. A "busk" site was chosen on a low hill overlooking the Arkansas River. Here, according to their traditions, they deposited ashes brought over the trail from their last fires in Alabama. The Tulsa-Lochapoka, a political division of the Creek Nation, established their "town." As late as 1896, the Lochapoka gathered here for ceremonies, feasts, and games. The site was probably not used by the Indians after the turn of the century. Gradually it became a solid residential area for the growing city of Tulsa. The Creek Council Tree itself, however, survived. The oak, standing in its small, well-landscaped city park, serves as a meaningful memorial to the proud Indian tribe that brought law and order to a new homeland nearly 156 years ago. The Creek Council Tree was placed under Historic Preservation Zoning in January of 1992. [Tulsa Preservation Commission]
 

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