918.298.2300
culture@nimi.us
@TulsaIndianArts
 
NIMI OFFICE
"Black Elk Speaks" - a production of the American Indian Theatre Company of Oklahoma - 1984, starring Will Sampson, David Carradine, and Wes Studi. Performing Arts Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma

Our Mission


The National Indian Monument and Institute (NIMI) is the parent company of the Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival, the American Indian Theatre Company of Oklahoma, and the American Indian Arts Association.

NIMI is an national non-profit organization actively promoting and creating Native related programs and preserving those cultures through the arts and education. Our mission is to honor, preserve, sustain, and celebrate American Indian cultures.
To further this, we are currently raising money to build an American Indian Cultural Center and Museum Complex. The intention of the Center is to provide a facility of cultural exchange--languages, theatre, arts, cuisine, history, and most importantly, friendship. 


Visit our DONATE page to contribute a tax deductible gift to help our ongoing projects - We appreciate your gift in any amount! If you would like to join our circle of friends and help us achieve our goals, please contact us! We can be reached at (918) 298-2300 or e-mail culture@nimi.us.
To further this, we are currently raising money to build an American Indian Cultural Center and Museum Complex. The intention of the Center is to provide a facility of cultural exchange--languages, theatre, arts, cuisine, history, and most importantly, friendship. 

MONTHLY LUNCHEON

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 2014

Siegi's Restaurant

SW Corner of 81st & Sheridan, Tulsa, OK 74114

 11:30 am: Lunch & Program – Open to the Public

PROGRAM: CLANCY GRAY, OSAGE ARTIST


Clancy Gray was the 1991 Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival Featured Artist, and participates in many art shows around the country. He is a member of the Osage Nation. Most of his jewelry is Southwest contemporary and he has been a silversmith for 25 years. 

His horned toad sculpture called "The Scout” won People’s Choice at the 2013 Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival. "When Indians were out hunting, they'd see a horny toad, pick it up and say a prayer, set it on the ground and whichever way it would go, that's the way they'd go hunting," Gray says.

His painting techniques are called impasto, which is done with acrylic paint and a pallet knife. Gray said he enjoys using lots of colors using the technique. He also uses watercolor and some pencil drawing techniques.

 

Luncheon is Open to the Public / Handicap Accessible

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