NIMI OFFICE
Council Oak Tree in Tulsa
"Black Elk Speaks" - a production of the American Indian Theatre Company of Oklahoma - 1984, starring Will Sampson, David Carradine, and Wes Studi. Performing Arts Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival

Our Mission


The National Indian Monument and Institute (NIMI) is the parent company of the Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival, the American Indian Theatre Company of Oklahoma, and the American Indian Arts Association.

NIMI is an national non-profit organization actively promoting and creating Native related programs and preserving those cultures through the arts and education. Our mission is to honor, preserve, sustain, and celebrate American Indian cultures.
To further this, we are currently raising money to build an American Indian Cultural Center and Museum Complex. The intention of the Center is to provide a facility of cultural exchange--languages, theatre, arts, cuisine, history, and most importantly, friendship. 


Visit our DONATE page to contribute a tax deductible gift to help our ongoing projects - We appreciate your gift in any amount! If you would like to join our circle of friends and help us achieve our goals, please contact us! We can be reached at (918) 298-2300 or e-mail culture@nimi.us.
To further this, we are currently raising money to build an American Indian Cultural Center and Museum Complex. The intention of the Center is to provide a facility of cultural exchange--languages, theatre, arts, cuisine, history, and most importantly, friendship. 

Margaret Roach Wheeler (Chickasaw/Choctaw)
Announced as Honored Elder Artist
for 2015 Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festial

Margaret Roach Wheeler has been announced as Honored Elder Artist for 2015 Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival (February 13-14-15, 2015). 

Wheeler, Chickasaw/Choctaw, is one of the few Native American weavers and textile artists who weaves her own cloth and then creates unique Native American-themed fashions, particularly Chickasaw historical pieces from 1000 AD to the 1900s.

Wheeler’s weavings have been featured in museums in Oklahoma, New Mexico, New York, Colorado, Indiana and Arizona. She was one of four Native American fashion designers selected to speak at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in New York. She was also one of the recipients of the artist-in-residence program for the NMAI. Her work was exhibited in “Changing Hands II” at the Museum of Art and Design in New York. Formerly an educator, Ms. Wheeler is now owner/operator of her company, Mahota Handwovens, designing and marketing hand-woven contemporary fashion, costumes and traditional Native American regalia.

Wheeler’s hand woven garments are shown at the major Indian Markets in North America. She lectures, teaches workshops and seminars on Native American fibers and her unique style of weaving.

Visit her website at: www.margaretroachwheeler.com

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